My work largely has been encompassed by the discipline of psychology, in which I have received advanced training and professional recognition. I am a Fellow of the American Psychological Association.

It should be noted I am not licensed to practice as a professional psychologist, that is, assessing or treating clients/patients in therapy. Thus, I am a psychologist in terms of my education, professional interests, and academic discipline, but I am not a psychologist in terms of licensure for assessment or treatment purposes.

Below, I describe my education and training, my professional interests, selected publications and presentations, and a summary of my teaching experience. A more detailed curriculum vitae (including funding history, research experience, and professional distinctions) is available upon request by academic departments, funding agencies, and research institutions (see “Contact” tab above).

Education and Training


  • I received my baccalaureate degree from Haverford College, where I majored in psychology.


  • My masters degree in counseling was from Fordham University’s Graduate School of Education.


  • I was awarded my doctoral degree in counseling psychology by the Department of Applied Psychology within the Steinhardt School of Culture, Education, and Human Development at New York University.


  • I worked full-time for a year as a predoctoral psychology intern at the Manhattan Psychiatric Center, the inpatient psychiatric care facility of last resort for Manhattan (and, essentially, for New York City). I completed a specialty rotation in the assessment and treatment of individuals with dissociative identity disorder (more popularly known as “multiple personality disorder”).


  • I received my internship credit after working full-time for a year as a predoctoral psychology intern at the outpatient mental health clinic of the Sunset Terrace Family Health Center of the Lutheran Medical Center in Brooklyn. At the time, Sunset Terrace was said to be the largest outpatient mental health clinic in New York City. I completed two year-long specialty rotations, one in the assessment and treatment of juvenile sex offenders and one in multicultural assessment research.


  • Dissertation: The Worldview Assessment Instrument (WAI): The Development and Preliminary Validation of an Instrument to Assess Dimensions of World View Relevant to Counseling and Psychotherapy.


Professional Interests

My professional interests in psychology primarily fall into these areas:


  • The worldview construct. Worldviews are sets of assumptions held by individuals and cultures about reality and life. (For example, “we’re all in this together” reflects one worldview position, while “it’s a dog-eat-dog world” reflects another.) I am interested in researching what forms worldviews, and how worldviews affect behavior, in many areas and on many scales, from individual choices about health behavior to issues of war and peace between societies.


  • Futurist psychology. This is a term of my own coinage, which I use to describe a specialty that considers the potential social and psychological consequences of possible future developments in the domain of technology, demography, and the human situation. (For example, the effects of virtual reality on personal relationships, or the impact of increased longevity on life satisfaction, are each concerns of futurist psychology.) I am interested in researching how to mitigate potentially negative effects, and how to enhance potentially positive effects, of developing technologies, such as virtual reality and artificial intelligence.


  • Assessment and treatment of psychopathology. In particular, I am interested in improving these functions for the great mass of people who do not enjoy superior insurance coverage. Cultural awareness in assessment and treatment is especially important to me.


  • Humanistic psychology and the psychology of religion. Human beings and their behavior are not purely the outcome of genetics (nature) and environment (nurture). To some extent, in a nontrivial way, people choose their behavior. At this historical moment, this is a controversial position to take within psychology. Humanistic psychology addresses how to better empower people to make productive choices (among other issues). The psychology of religion addresses how people’s experience of the transcendent affects their choices in life (again, among other issues).


Selected Publications and Presentations

Worldviews


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2004). The psychology of worldviews. Review of General Psychology, 8, 3-58. doi: 10.1037/1089-2680.8.1.3 (Online at scribd.com and academia.edu)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E., Ganey, H. C. N., Dalton, J., & Hancock, P. A. (2004). Worldview and acculturation as predictors of performance: Addressing these variables in human factors/ergonomics research. In Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society, 48, 1223-1227. (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2006, Spring). Worldviews, families, and grand theories: Strategies for unification in psychology. The General Psychologist, 41(1), 11-14.  (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2006-2007, Winter). Religions influence worldviews; worldviews influence behavior: A model with research agenda. Psychology of Religion Newsletter, 32(1), 1-10. (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2007). The worldview construct and peace psychology. Peace Psychology, 16(1), 27-28. (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2007, August). What are cognitive structures? Are worldviews cognitive structures? Paper presented at APA meeting, San Francisco, CA.


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2008, August). Analysis of worldviews underlying different approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Poster presented at APA meeting, Boston. (Abstract online here.) at )


Futurist Psychology


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E., Gromadzin, B., & Passmore, L. (2002, March). Genomic information, timeframes, personality, and worldviews: Effects on health-related decisions. Symposium presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, Kissimmee, Florida.


  • May, T., & Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2003, March). Attitudes towards cloning: Relationship to trait, worldview, and religious variables. Poster presented at the annual meeting of the Southeastern Psychological Association, New Orleans.


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2005). The potential societal impact of augmented cognition. In G. Salvendy (Ed.), HCI International 2005: 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction [CD-ROM, unpaginated]. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2005). The potential societal impact of virtual reality. In K. M. Stanney & M. Zyda (Eds.), Advances in virtual environments technology: Musings on design, evaluation, and applications. Volume 9 in G. Salvendy (Series Ed.), HCI International 2005: 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction [CD-ROM, unpaginated]. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum. (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2005). Toward clarity in augmented cognition theory and research: Cognitive and physiological states and processes. In G. Salvendy (Ed.), HCI International 2005: 11th International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction [CD-ROM, unpaginated]. Mahwah, NJ: Erlbaum.


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2005, August). Psychology of some 21st century issues: Longevity, genetic engineering, hardship. In M. E. Koltko-Rivera (Chair), 21st century psychology—Selected issues, methods, and areas of focus. Symposium conducted at APA meeting, Washington, DC.


Assessment and Treatment of Psychopathology


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E., & Niebuhr, D. W. (2004). The Entry Psychiatric Screen (EPS): A psychiatric screening procedure for applicants for military service. In Proceedings of the Army Science Conference [CD-ROM, unpaginated]. Washington, DC: United States Army. (An early version of this paper is online here. Contact me for a full version of this paper, as presented at the Army Science Conference.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2008, August). Analysis of worldviews underlying different approaches to counseling and psychotherapy. Poster presented at APA meeting, Boston. (Abstract online here.)


Humanistic Psychology


  • Koltko, M. E. (1989, August). Is transpersonal psychology feasible as a scientific psychology? A bottom-up approach. Paper presented at the hospitality suite of the Transpersonal Psychology Interest Group, New Orleans.


  • Koltko, M. E. (1992, August). Transpersonal psychology: A humanistic research agenda for psychology’s next century.  Paper presented at APA meeting, Washington, DC.


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (1998). Maslow’s “Transhumanism”: Was transpersonal psychology conceived as “a psychology without people in it”? Journal of Humanistic Psychology, 38, 71-80. (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2006). Rediscovering the later version of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs: Self-transcendence and opportunities for theory, research, and unification. Review of General Psychology, 10, 302-317. doi: 10.1037/1089-2680.10.4.302 (Online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2008, August). Humanistic psychology and the transformation of psychological science and practice. [APA Division 32, award address, Early Career Award for Inquiry]. Invited address: Paper presented at APA meeting, Boston.


Psychology of Religion


  • Koltko, M. E. (1990). How [client] religious beliefs affect psychotherapy: The example of Mormonism. Psychotherapy: Theory, Research, Practice, Training, 27, 132-141. (Abstract and paywall online here.)


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2006, August). Basis of belief: A new construct’s definition, assessment, and correlates. Paper presented at APA meeting, New Orleans, LA.


  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2006, August). Religiosity-in-Five-Dimensions (R5D) Scale: Religiosity, psychopathology, worldview, personality. Paper presented at APA meeting, New Orleans, LA.

  • Koltko-Rivera, M. E. (2006-2007, Winter). Religions influence worldviews; worldviews influence behavior: A model with research agenda. Psychology of Religion Newsletter, 32(1), 1-10. (Online here.)


Teaching Experience

I have taught the following courses at a variety of schools, including both public and private undergraduate and graduate institutions. Unless otherwise noted, the courses were taught at the undergraduate level.


   Psychology Core Courses


  • Introduction to Psychology [3 sections]
  • Basic Learning Processes
  • Personality Theory
  • Social Psychology
  • Developmental Psychology
  • Abnormal Psychology (doctoral and masters students)


   Statistics and Research Design


  • Basic Statistics I [4 sections] (doctoral, masters, and undergraduate students)
  • Basic Statistics II [8 sections] (doctoral, masters, and undergraduate students)
  • Psychological Measurement
  • Research Methods in Psychology
  • Laboratory in Advanced Research Methods


   Clinical and Counseling


  • Individual Counseling Practice I [14 sections] (counseling masters degree students)
  • Introduction to Child, Adolescent, & Family Therapies (clinical masters degree students)
  • Essential Counseling Skills for Pastoral Settings (masters degree students)
  • Multicultural Counseling Skills for Pastoral Settings [2 sections] (doctoral and masters degree students)


   Electives / Topics


  • Sleep and Dreams [3 sections]
  • Psychology of Religion [2 sections] (masters and undergraduate students)
  • Trans-Cultural Perspectives in Psychology (masters and undergraduate students)

Mark Koltko-Rivera

Receiving the Carmi Harari Early Career Award for Inquiry from the Society for Humanistic Psychology. Convention of the American Psychological Association, Boston, August 2008.

The Manhattan Psychiatric Center

Wards Island Complex, New York City

Award talk at the American Psychological Association convention, Boston, August 2008. The occasion was my being awarded the George A. Miller Award for an outstanding article in general psychology (for the second time), from the Society of General Psychology.